Maine’s biggest Fly Fishing party of the year!
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Come join us at what has become Maine’s biggest Fly Fishing party of the year!

 

The Fly Fishing Film Tour (aka F3T) is returning…and bigger and better than ever! FFIM is very proud to bring this tour back to Maine in our 6th year of hosting at the Frontier Cafe and Cinema in Brunswick this coming weekend, on 3/6 and 3/7. We will have 4 screenings this year (5pm and 8pm each day), and we’ve sold out all screenings in each of the past 5 years. And as if that wasn’t enough — the Brunswick screenings on Saturday will be preceded by the 2nd annual “Iron Fly” competition. This fly tying contest, brought to you by Maine River Guides, is not to be missed! Tyers will create a fly limited only by their imagination utilizing only ten materials given at the beginning of the event. Participants will have 30 minutes to create and deliver their creation to the finish line (judges booth) in the allotted time given. Tyers are required to register in advance for $20 by contacting Greg Bostater of Maine River Guides at maineriverguides@gmail.com or 207-749-1593. Advance purchase of tickets to the Film Tour is strongly recommended.

 

For tickets to the Brunswick screenings, please visit: http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/1269136 Tight lines, and see you at the Tour!

All About The Bass!!
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ENJOY!!!!

FUNNY VIDEO!!

Jesus Culture – Rooftops!!
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Check out this video!!!

 

 

 

Thank You Lord for My Life…my wife …my everlasting life.

May you all Have a wonderful Christmas!!!

What are those little black spots?
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What are those little black spots?

“What are the black spots on the trout I just caught” is the most common question we hear this time of year. As soon as June arrives and anglers all over the State hit their favorite fishing hole, trout with “those black specks” start showing up. Here is some good information from former IF&W biologists to answer common questions such as: What is it? What causes it? Can I eat it?

“Black spot disease” or “black grub” in trout is caused by a trematode worm in its larval, or immature, stage. The tell-tale sign is small, sand-grain sized black spots on trout and other fishes. The level of infestation can range from just a few, barely noticeable spots to heavy with the fish nearly covered as in the large trout in the photo.

Heavy (larger trout) and low black spot infestation in brook trout from a northern Maine pond.

Heavy (larger trout) and low black spot infestation in brook trout from a northern Maine pond.

The species of trematode worm that causes black spot uses snails and fish as intermediate hosts in their immature stages.  Loons are the most common host for the adult worm living in the bird’s mouth and producing eggs that are eventually passed through the loon’s gut and into the water.  The eggs mature and produce ciliated miracidia that penetrate snails and other molluscs (the first intermediate host).  The worm develops into cercariae within the snail. As trout ingest and digest infected snails, cercariae become mobile, penetrating tissues of the second intermediate host (the trout). The mechanical damage caused by this mobile stage causes hemorrhaging.  Once the cercariae become stationary in the fish’s skin it produces the visible scarring in a slightly raised black spot.  The cycle is completed when a loon ingests an infected fish.

Anglers are usually most interested in whether trout with black spot are edible.  Proper cooking kills the parasite and renders the fish completely safe to eat.

Retired IF&W biologist Ron Brokaw wrote this 1972 article for Maine Fish and Game magazine.  Maine IF&W’s Fish Health Laboratory also released a more recent report on black spot as well.

Mongrel Meat…….. FLY
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