A review of the Norway Industries Zip Strip. 

 Overall Rating:  ****+ (4+ stars of 5)

 

Above:  The Norway Industry’s Zip Strip.  The carbon steel can oxidize quickly.

Specifications (from the Norway Industries website):  

  • The Zip-Strip® has a razor-sharp edge which removes any vane from any shaft as well as any residual adhesive. NO MORE damaged carbon arrows!
  • Made at Norway Industries of premium grade tool steel and heat treated for durable long-term wear this handy tool is a must for all arrow-smiths.
  • Easily sharpens with a flat file on the back surface or a round file on the curved front surface.
  • Strip arrows quickly & easily. The fastest, cleanest way to strip old or damaged vanes! 

Performance:  ****+ (4+ stars of 5).  Having traditionally and successfully used an old, dull steak knife I found in my father’s bachelor-living box for feather and vane removal I didn’t really think there could be much improvement on this task.  I can only say I was wrong – way wrong.  The first time I used the Zip-Strip on some plastic vanes it actually shot them off the arrow about 18 inches – right into the trash can!  The rounded blade is superior for tough glue removal without damage to arrows.        

Pros:

  • Truly “zips” vanes, feathers, old glue and remnants of wraps right off arrows.
  • Rounded blade fits arrows’ contour.
  • Tool’s handle fits well while the angle allows proper pressure on the arrow. 
  • Does not damage arrows. 

Cons:   

  • None, other than price, possibly.

Above:  The Zip Strip in use.  Note that we had to shoot this controlled removal twice – the first vane shot off so quickly we couldn’t capture the shot.

Cost:  *** (3 stars of 5).  $28-35 street price. 

Manufacturer’s Customer Service:  ***** (5 stars of 5).  I met Jill Haliburton of Norway Industries at the ATA show in 2011 and I’ve conversed a bit with Janis Milton via e-mail and phone.  Both are extremely nice people.  A caller is just as likely to find Janis working on the manufacturing floor as in the office. 

Above:  Jill Haliburton of Norway Industries models the company’s Zeon Fusion Vanes.  

Source:  Purchased through a cooperative program directly from Norway Industries. 

General notes:  I find I get the most complete vane/feather and glue removal by using the tool with the blade’s concave face up in one direction and then using it flat side up in the same direction (toward nock for instance).  Then I do it over again in the other direction (toward field point in this example).  Followed up with some acetone the arrows are usually very clean, smooth and ready for new vanes or feathers.

happy hunting, dv

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Copyright © Jerry E Long, 2009-2011